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Blood Moon Eclipse On April 15 ~ How come eclipses visible from the USA, seem to attract that much more media attention? Is it because the US owns the Internet or because subjectively, there seem to have been fewer eclipses of the lunar or solar variety you could see from North America during recent years? This event hits the sign of Libra and counts in lots of ways…
Brightest Stars ~ Here is a list of the brightest stars, out of the 5000 or so visible to the naked eye, depending on your location and eyesight. Click on the link under Proper Name, to find out everything conceivable about each star, from an astronomical perspective anyway. Remember too the stars that look brightest, are probably really planets…
British Astronomical Association ~ Since 1890, the BAA has been a champion of amateur astronomers in the UK. It encourages a practical and hands-on approach to celestial observation, that can be accessed by anyone interested in the universe at large. The regularly updated notes on what to look for in the night sky, are a comprehensive and valuable source of reference.
C/2012 S1 ~ C/2012 S1, also known as Comet ISON after the organisation whose telescope spotted it, will soon become visible if the astronomers are correct. There is much speculation across the Web about this comet’s arrival, plus a bunch of highly technical data that has now been superseded. This Wikipedia entry presents the known facts in an easily digestible manner…
Cassini Solstice Mission ~ Beginning life as Cassini–Huygens, Huygens was a Titan probe that detached from the planetary orbiter Cassini in 2004. This mission was originally launched in 1997, but has been further extended through 2017, to continue studying the structure and dynamics of Saturn, its ring system and 62 moons that have so far been discovered.
Celestial Observer ~ Otherwise known as CalSky, when it comes to astronomical observing this site is hard to parallel. To get some idea of its scope try following the Calendar link, then enter your location, level of experience, the stars, planets, lunar phenomena and other criteria that you’re after, choose a time frame and hit calculate. Stunning…
Ceres ~ Last in a series that in early 2009, highlights the five dwarf planets named so far, here’s the astronomy around Ceres, initially called an asteroid and discovered in 1801. As goddess of the harvest and cereals especially, Ceres seems suited to the rulership of Virgo, leaving Mercury to Gemini only, as it probably ought to be…
Chandra X-ray Observatory ~ The Chandra X-ray Observatory orbits at an altitude of 139,000km or a third of the distance to the Moon. Since 1999 it has been NASA’s flagship mission for X-ray astronomy and numbers among the world’s greatest observatories. Try checking out the photo galleries and added information on the constellations especially…
Chariklo Has A Ring System ~ A learned article, with all credit to the original source. Chariklo was the fifth centaur to be discovered, extending a family of diminutive bodies situated between the outer planets and now growing in number as telescopes improve. At the time of writing, Chariklo has been spotted with a ring system, like Saturn and Uranus. Word to the Mother Ship…
Chasing Comets ~ Anticipating the visibility and brightness of any comet a long way in advance seems a tricky task, fraught with the sort of unpredictability that makes firm forecasts a risky business. It is lucky, these observations are a job for an astronomer rather than an astrologer, then. This site does it well, on a monthly basis that is not hard to follow…
Chiron Shrinking! ~ After recent revelations about Xena being much smaller than first thought, it is sobering to realise that this is not the only minor planet with rapidly diminishing dimensions. Early work put Chiron’s diameter at up to 400km, by 1998 this was down to 170km and in May 2006 it is thought to be 142km tops, according to the latest from Wikipedia…
Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) ~ C/2012 S1 (ISON) was discovered on 21 September 2012 using the International Scientific Optical Network (ISON) telescope, and the rest of its name is derived from the date of this discovery. Some say that on November 28, 2013 it will shine brighter than a full moon. Coincidentally or maybe not, that is Thanksgiving Day in the USA.
Comet ISON Observing Campaign ~ Dubbed the Comet of the Century and slated to shine fifteen times brighter than the Moon, Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) reached its anticipated perihelion on Thanksgiving Day then disappeared, having only ever been seen by a few lucky scientists. A lot of astronomers and at least one high-profile astrologer, are feeling very silly right now…
Cometography ~ Comets have always inspired awe and wonder. This site is for all those who have ever been gripped by such phenomena. You’ll find comprehensive information regarding comets that are currently visible, periodic comets, memorable comets and comet researchers and discoveries. An excellent resource.
Constellation Photos ~ This site has pictures of the constellations from the northern hemisphere with their figurative outlines drawn on top of them. I do wonder how anybody saw these representations in the sky originally and hugely admire those able to locate them consistently now, especially from their own backyards like these two people can…
Constellations And Their Stars ~ An older site so far as the Internet goes; produced by Chris Dolan during the 1990s when he was studying astronomy for his PhD at the University of Wisconsin. With plenty of technical information about the constellations and the stars that comprise them, be ready for a few links that no longer work or don’t yield the expected results.
Corot ~ Launched on 27 December 2006, the Corot space mission is searching for telluric exoplanets, meaning planets outside the solar system that are like the Earth, or exoEarths, to you and me. They expect by observing thousands of stars, that “tens” of new Earths will soon be earmarked for the next property boom.