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Corot ~ Launched on 27 December 2006, the Corot space mission is searching for telluric exoplanets, meaning planets outside the solar system that are like the Earth, or exoEarths, to you and me. They expect by observing thousands of stars, that “tens” of new Earths will soon be earmarked for the next property boom.
Curiosity Rover: Martian Solar Day #2 ~ I’d be remiss not featuring NASA’s Curiosity rover, currently beaming back some of the best pictures of the surface of Mars since landing there on August 6, 2012. This interactive panorama was stitched together and uploaded by Andrew Bodrov from Estonia, member of the International Virtual Reality Photography Association.
Current Impact Risks ~ Can anyone remember a time when there wasn’t an asteroid about to hit the Earth? It’s a perennially popular subject for the media everywhere, but here you’ll find the true facts and all the latest data. Again a part of NASA’s Near Earth Object program, making a speciality of this sort of thing!
Danjon Scale ~ How the Moon appears during a total lunar eclipse is affected by atmospheric conditions here on Earth. While our shadow blocks out any direct light, some is refracted through the atmosphere to give the Moon a copper hue. The Danjon Scale records the luminosity and appearance of a total lunar eclipse. It was first proposed by André-Louis Danjon in 1921…
Dawn Mission Home Page ~ With the launch of the Dawn mission to the protoplanets (their word!) Ceres and Vesta scheduled for July 7, 2007 this extensive site from NASA answers every question you could possibly have, plus a whole bunch more. Just don’t hold your breath though. Rendezvous with Vesta is scheduled for 2011, with Ceres for 2015…
Digital Images of the Sky ~ A collection of stunning celestial imagery from those who appreciate and wonder about the beauty of space, rather than aiming to crash rockets into bits of it or send animals to perish out there. The time-lapse movies of intriguing nightscapes and celestial phenomena are fascinating, also the section on the constellations too…
Dr. Islam’s Astronomy Course ~ At first I thought this would be a dubious parody, but it turns out Dr. Azad Islam really is a professor in the Physics department at SUNY Potsdam, Potsdam, NY from where he seems to draw mixed reviews. Still, his astronomy course is a good introduction to most astronomical basics, while the chapter notes are largely what you ought to review.
Dwarf Planets ~ You’ll remember, back in August 2006, when Xena became Eris, Pluto ceased to be a planet and Ceres ceased to be an asteroid, and all three became the first dwarf planets. That would be that you’d think, except that at the time of writing, there are six known objects beyond Neptune bigger than Ceres, and their classification remains unclear…
Dwarf Planets #2 ~ Now further dwarf planets are being discovered all the time, it’s amusing thinking back to some of the outrageous astrological pronouncements that greeted the discovery of Quaoar, Sedna and Eris for example, when many still thought the chaos of outer space would fit more readily into the existing scheme of things…
Earth’s Busy Neighborhood ~ Minor-object science studies Solar System asteroids, comets, dwarf planets, Kuiper Belt and other trans-Neptunian objects; the Oort Cloud, meteors and meteorites; interplanetary and interstellar dust particles, besides circumstellar disks where such objects exist around other stars. Those on course to collide with the Earth, get a special mention…
EarthSky ~ An attempt to improve the public perception of science, by offering an accessible platform for scientists to speak directly to their audience, on whatever they are getting enthusiastic over. The popular posts feed of the space section proves interesting, providing details of highlights in the sky at night before other sources…
Eclipse 2017 ~ With about a month to go until the first eclipse seen from the mainland United States in over thirty-eight years, the Internet cranks up a gear. I have previously mentioned the commercial opportunity that represents for some, but this site is maintained by an enthusiast. It is a nightmare to navigate, yet the content augments the input elsewhere from Fred Espenak.
Eclipse Chasers ~ Eclipse chasers are people who travel round the world, viewing each total or annular solar eclipse, as these fire off roughly every eighteen months or so. Don’t make the embarrassing mistake of a certain British astrologer, who advised the latest eclipse would be visible from one remote location, when you couldn’t have actually expected, to see it from there at all.
Eclipse Crossroads of America ~ As the Great American Eclipse fades from the headlines, those in the northeastern and central United States, have less than seven years to wait until the next big event. The village of Makanda in Southern Illinois, saw the lengthiest eclipse in 2017. It is also where the path of the April 8, 2024 eclipse is forecast to intersect with its predecessor.
Eclipse Geeks ~ Much has been written about eclipses, especially during recent years. Yet to an objective observer, the response of astrologers to this plethora of scientific data, might seem muted and confused. Countless paragraphs will be written about minor alignments you can’t even see, while such a wholly unforgettable spectacle is often downplayed and misrepresented…
Eclipse Home Page ~ Painstakingly maintained by Fred Espenak of NASA and the Goddard Space Flight Centre, this site “strives to be the ultimate resource for online information about eclipses.” From an astronomical perspective it most certainly is too. Anything you’d ever wish to know is here, plus a whole bunch more you’d never even thought about.
Eclipse Magnitude & Obscuration ~ The Moon has an elliptical orbit around the Earth, while the Earth’s path around the Sun is equally skewed. Nowadays, folk realise the Moon and Sun look different day to day and thus, between solar eclipses. In short: the magnitude of an eclipse doesn’t necessarily reflect how much of the Sun is obscured. This app does the maths for you…