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Eclipse Maps ~ What has been dubbed the Great American Eclipse is just a few weeks away. Those in the mainland United States have waited decades, since the path of totality in a full solar event is only seen from a specific area. If you won't be lucky enough to catch the spectacle this time, I’d recommend looking at the maps in this gallery, to find out the next eclipse near you.
Eclipse Megamovie ~ This is how the Great American Eclipse looked to those present. From the shores of the Pacific to the coast of the Atlantic, this exceptional event was shared and documented by those surely most deserving of the chance. And fortuitously, the weather didn’t disappoint. Still under development presently; you can savour the spectacle from wherever you are…
Eclipser ~ Jay Anderson is a retired meteorologist who still teaches at the University of Manitoba based in Winnipeg, Canada. These days he devotes his time to chasing solar eclipses around the world and is a knowleable source of reference on forthcoming events: with particular regard to the prevailing weather conditions, a critical factor is you are travelling a very long way…
EclipseWise.com ~ Fred Espenak served for over thirty years as NASA’s resident eclipse expert. His knowledge of these phenomena is unsurpassed and extends to his personal website, one of three he currently maintains. Back in 1996, he was the first person I ever emailed. Despite the chasm between astrologers and astronomers, I’ll remain forever grateful for his personal reply.
Encyclopedia Astronautica ~ This guy is in love with his subject. Look his name is Wade, there’s a surprise! Don’t be scared off by the front page and the eye to erm, design. Anything you wanted to know about space travel is here, plus a lot more besides, so just start clicking and see where you end up. Think it isn’t rocket science? Oh yes, it is!
Encyclopedia of Astrobiology, Astronomy and Space Flight ~ This site is an online reference of information about astronomy, astrobiology, space flight, physics and other areas of science and mathematics, both conventional and more speculative, such as teleportation and time travel. It is updated daily by astronomer David Darling.
Encyclopedia of Meteorites ~ Distinguishing a genuine meteorite or shooting star that fell to Earth, from your average rock and therefore “meteor-wrong” is not a straightforward task. Hence the International Meteorite Collectors Association, whose members will confirm the authenticity of a particular specimen and developed this encyclopedia, to detail and record known finds.
Ephemeris.com ~ An ephemeris lists planetary positions and other astronomical data, at regular intervals and over a given period. This online ephemeris doesn’t seem to have been updated for a while, but still works beautifully across all operating systems, as well as giving details of your sidereal time that can be hard to find out.
ESA - Space Science ~ Most have heard of NASA, unless they live somewhere needing astronomical intervention, but fewer notice its country cousin ESA, otherwise known as the European Space Agency. Now you’re better informed you have no excuse for not visiting their website, which has plenty of material to capture your attention, anyhow.
Europa ~ Europa is the smallest of Jupiter’s four Galilean moons, discovered by Galileo Galilei in 1610. It is the fourth largest Jovian moon and sixth overall in the solar system: after its three contemporaries, Saturn’s Titan and Earth’s familiar companion. Much hope rides on Europa, as science says it is the body most likely to sustain primitive life. Think Antarctica, but much colder…
Evening Sky Map ~ Every month this site offers a printable map of the sky, for several locations and a number of different languages, that you can download and use in your stargazing exploits. It’s free for educational or non-commercial purposes and lists what you should look out for each night with your telescope, binoculars or your naked eye…
Exploring Comets ~ A short guide from the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. Of special interest is the section on comet names. Thus C/2012 S1 (ISON) is a non-periodic comet (C/). It was the first comet (1) spotted during the second half of September (S) 2012, using the International Scientific Optical Network (ISON) telescope. Got that?
Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia ~ Exoplanets orbit stars beyond the Sun. They exhibit a range of physical properties and can be smaller than the Earth, right up to the deuterium-burning limit of around thirteen times the mass of Jupiter, that distinguishes a giant planet from a brown dwarf. The study of these bodies is one of the fastest growing fields of astronomy…
Eyes On The Solar System ~ Web app created by NASA using their data, to help you explore the solar system in 3D. It has two main parts, one concentrating on immersive visualisations that follow the Juno mission to Jupiter, the other allowing you to zoom around in outer space at will. You’ll need to install the Unity Web Player, but that’s a straightforward process…
Fluxtimator ~ Pick your favourite meteor shower from the list provided. Choose your location or input your geographical coordinates. Select the viewing conditions that fit best and a date when you know the shower of interest will be visible. The Fluxtimator works out how many meteors you’ll see each hour and pinpoints the peak time for you to look.
From Stargazers to Starships ~ Scholarly offering from NASA, last updated in 2005 and archived for posterity. This is a website from another age, when people weren’t afraid to put their home address on the Internet and believed the value of the World Wide Web lay in its potential for education. It is aimed at high-school learners, yet much of its content still pertains to astrologers.
Galaxy Zoo ~ An online astronomy project that needs your help with classifying over a million galaxies from pictures taken by a robotic telescope, because your brain spots patterns better than even the fastest computer. No prior knowledge is required, there’s an excellent tutorial and it’s all totally addictive once you’re quite confident.
Ganymede ~ Scientists now say there are 190 moons, travelling round the eight astrological planets. This includes Earth’s own satellite and the five moons of Pluto: as dwarf planet or not, the impact of this body is beyond question to those observing its effects. The biggest moon in the Solar System at 5,268 km across is Ganymede. This orbits Jupiter and is 8% larger than Mercury.